One year of using a treadmill desk

I rotate through shoes each day. So far, they've lasted a long time. Walk, walk, walk.

I rotate through shoes each day. So far, they’ve lasted a long time. Walk, walk, walk.

Here’s the fact I like most about the past 12 months of walking 50 to 70 miles a week while working: One hospitalization.

Yep. In years past, that number would be two or three hospital stays in a 12-month period. And the only reason for the last visit in November was because I caught the virus from hell.

Luck? Perhaps. But isn’t luck something we make ourselves?

There’s no doubt my conditioning is much better. I don’t get tired when we’re out and I walk a long distance. I can stand while others with normal health sit. I can stand all day now.

(Knock on wood to all of this, as life has a way of punishing me when I write good things here. I’ll risk it.)

So, in the last 12+ months, I estimate I’ve walked across the country – 2,500 miles or more. I average 10 to 14 miles a day, and 50 to 60 a week. Sometimes more than 70. My record for one day is 18 miles.

Total steps in the last year: I’m in the millions. I wish that total was in dollars.

I do my treatments while I walk. I eat M&Ms Minis while I walk. I eat and spill yogurt while I walk. I’m writing this post while I’m walking. And so far I’ve done all of these without wiping out, though I’ve had close calls.

The one downside created by the miles is planter fasciitis. The reality: my feet hurt. It’s hard to walk barefooted now. But it’s been worth the benefits to my lungs and the endurance I’ve gained in my legs.

I’ve lost about 10 pounds, a lot of it around my gut. And I’ve done it without eating less.

I’m grateful I read the New Yorker article a year ago and learned about walking on a treadmill while working. It had never occurred to me that there was an alternative to sitting all day at a computer. Lucky me, I say. Lucky me.

 

Advertisements

I fly again, and live to blog about it

I can’t remember how long it’s been since I was on an airplane. 3 or 4 years? Last week, I left the state for the first time since we drove to Las Vegas. And it went smoothly. Too smoothly, as if the air-travel gods were luring me back to the sky.

It did help that I took an Ativan before leaving for the airport. But security was a breeze, though I did receive the usual X-ray rescan of my compressor and cold pack for my Cayston. Snowpiercer and the sequel to 300 kept my mind occupied on the flight, and I touched down in New Jersey ahead of schedule. Too smooth.

The rented O2 concentrator was at the hotel when I arrived. Smooth.

This is the O2 Concentrator to own. It's quiet as a fan and doesn't weigh as much as bulkier units. I'm looking into swapping my noisy home unit for one of these.

This is the O2 Concentrator to own. It’s quiet as a fan and doesn’t weigh as much as bulkier units. I’m looking into swapping my noisy home unit for one of these.

After a brutal week of intense 12-hour days of work launching our training event, and an episode of A fib one stressful morning, I flew home. Okay, so the A fib wasn’t very fun, but I know how to deal with it now. I told everyone I was car sick and waited for the double Ativan dose to kick in.

With the exception of some blood on the day following my return, I’ve been okay, knock on wood. I wonder if the blood had anything to do with my falling asleep on the plane and possibly destatting? Question for my doctor.

Though I didn’t cough up blood on the flight, or at my destination, I have no interest in getting on a plane anytime soon. I still hate the whole process of flying. And I only flew this time because it was summer. Flying in the winter? No thanks.

But at least this time I made it back without any stories of hospitals. That, my friends, is cause for celebration.

 

 

Giving it all to my job right now

I’m leading part of a large training event at work right now and its sucking up all of my creative energy to complete it. And I’m working long days and putting in hours on weekends to finish all of the deliverables on time. Luckily, I’m working with a good team.

I traveled by car last week and was so tired on day 2 of the training session, I looked right at someone I’ve known for 12 years and couldn’t remember his name. Just blanked. Name gone. Later, I had to Google, “fatigue and memory loss.” Yep, it can happen.

My memory improved with a good night of sleep. But why I was so tired was something most of my co-workers didn’t understand. What they didn’t know was when I go back to the hotel, I have 90 minutes of treatments to complete before sleeping. Then I get to wake up early in the morning to knock out another 90 minutes. So, working long hours and having CF is a bad mix on the road and equals limited sleep.

And I have more travel coming soon – on a plane.

I don’t remember the last time I was on a plane. It must have been at least three or four years ago. I’m going to give it a try again for this project that has consumed much of my time these days. I’m not looking forward to flying, and a small nugget of fear in my head grows larger as the day approaches. I will self-medicate for the flight.

One worry I have is that I now use O2 at night. I need to find a place that rents O2 generators in the other city. My center couldn’t help. So, I’m going to call the CF center where I’m going to ask if they can help.

That’s it for now. I miss blogging. But there are bills to pay and a 12-year old to send to college. No rest for the weary.